Moog Multimoog

Moog Multimoog synthesizer
Moog Multimoog

Should I be embarassed to admit I had never heard of the Multimoog until this one showed up on our doorstep? The Multimoog was a Moog monosynth made between 1978 and 1981 and I’m not sure I understand how it was intended to fit into the Moog product line, or what is “multi” about it.  Continue reading “Moog Multimoog”

Moog Taurus (and a Prodigy)

Moog Taurus I bass pedal synthesizer
Moog Taurus I

The Taurus is a funny little (actually quite awkward and heavy) bass synth produced by Moog between ’75 and ’81 that is designed with a one octave, organ style pedal board meant to be played with your feet. It has a limited number of actual features… just one sawtooth waveform for both of its oscillators, the obvious 24db Moog ladder filter, portamento (glide), and a simple attack and decay envelope for the VCA and filter. It’s basically meant to do one thing well, which is make bass sounds, and it does it as well as any other Moog synth I’ve played. Though, I will admit it is a fun and unique experience to sweep the filter with my foot using a giant foot-sized slider.

Moog Prodigy
Moog Prodigy

We had a Prodigy in the workshop at the same time, which is the Moog Taurus’s immediate Moog monosynth contemporary. Comparing their sounds when set to equivalent settings, even before comparing the schematics it was clear that even at its highest cutoff setting, the Taurus’s filter, compared to that of the Prodigy, was still cutting a good deal of high frequencies. It was really designed to be used as a bass synth only. Continue reading “Moog Taurus (and a Prodigy)”

Moog Opus 3

Moog Opus 3 synthesizer
Moog Opus 3

The Moog Opus 3 was Moog’s only string/ensemble synth. Today it is the perfect choice for you if you want string synth limitations at a Moog price. I think the organ sound is better than average, the string sound is a little worse, and a typical Moog filter on the “brass” section makes it at least better than the average string synth’s brass/synth tone. Continue reading “Moog Opus 3”

Moog Model 15 Modular

Moog Model 15 Modular Synthesizer
Moog Model 15 Modular Synthesizer (1974)

My first Moog modular restoration. This beloved American classic is certainly the most terrifyingly valuable synth I’ve ever worked on, worth several times as much as my car, more than the equity we own in our house after paying our mortgage for two years, and more money than I’ll probably earn this entire year. Continue reading “Moog Model 15 Modular”

Moog Werkstatt – custom mod project

modified Moog Werkstatt
Modified Moog Werkstatt

I just finished up some intense custom mods on this Moog Werkstatt. I packed in a bunch of cool goodies and the case of this little synth is now totally at capacity. It even bulges a little bit, and it feels noticeably heavier. It sounds amazing if I do say so myself. Continue reading “Moog Werkstatt – custom mod project”

Moog Satellite

Moog Satellite Synthesizer
Moog Satellite Synthesizer

The Moog Satellite is the Moog not even its own mother could love, Bob Moog’s least favorite Moog and mine as well.  It is a preset monosynth (!?) created in the early 1970s as an accessory for Thomas Organ Company home organs, at a time when boring middle class people all over the US were listening to Switched on Bach and were excited to get their own Moog and pronounce it “MOOOOg.” Continue reading “Moog Satellite”

Moog Rogue

Moog "The Rogue"
Moog Rogue

The Moog Rogue is very, very similar to the Moog MG-1.  It has pretty much the same internal design in the synth section, but the designers made some questionable choices about which parameters to allow control of– so unlike the MG-1, both oscillators on the Rogue have to have the same waveform, and be in the same octave. Continue reading “Moog Rogue”

Moog / Realistic MG-1

 I love these little Radioshack Moogs! I have a MG-1 of my own that I overhauled and heavily modded a while ago, and I’m always happy to bring another into the shop. They are so simple and there are only a couple parts that are hard to find– the sliders, the switches, and the MM5823 frequency divider ICs. This MG-1 was not in too bad shape, and the foam under the panel had mostly been removed already, but had one of the three divider ICs not working.
Service Tips
If you have several octaves of a handful of notes not playing, the MM5823 frequency divider ICs are the culprit.  I found a clever replacement solution from Flatkeys, a company in the UK— a little SMD board that fits right into the place where the original 14-pin DIP IC went.
There was also a slider with a broken wiper, but I couldn’t find any sliders of that type with the right value (10K) anywhere on the internet, so I bought a 2M one from Syntaur, took both apart and swapped out the resistive strips– as I was doing it, I was telling myself, “I am doing a ridiculous thing,” but it worked.
 
Work done: replaced all electrolytic capacitors, cleaned switches, cleaned and lubricated sliders, replaced MM5823 IC, replaced one bad slider, added 1/4″ output jack